Contents

Days Of The Underground isn’t a standard music biography, so a few words of explanation... Roughly speaking, there are four types of ‘chapter’ in the book:


[CHRONOLOGY] A year-by-year overview of and commentary on Hawkwind’s progress through the 1970s, including analyses of every non-album and relevant solo recording released or broadcast at the time
[ALBUMS] A track-by-track, in-depth look at each album, from Hawkwind to Levitation
[ESSAYS] A series of think pieces on Hawkwind’s musical and cultural impact on the 1970s and beyond, from psychedelia to science fiction, myth-making to punk
[INTERVIEWS] Conducted 2016-19 with key members of the Hawkwind crew 

And this is what's inside:

A Note On The Text

[INTRODUCTION] In Visions Of Acid, We Saw Through Delusion
[CHRONOLOGY] 1969: Standing On The Runway
[ESSAY] The Death And Resurrection Of British Psychedelia: Reigniting The Flames Of The Experimental 60s
[CHRONOLOGY] 1970: Hundreds Of People Like You And Me
[ALBUM] Hawkwind
[ESSAY] The Origins Of Space Rock: Parallels And Precursors To The Hawkwind Sound
[CHRONOLOGY] 1971: Charged With Cosmic Energy
[ALBUM] In Search Of Space
[INTERVIEW] Nik Turner
[ESSAY] The Making Of A People's Band: A Brief Trip Through The British Counterculture, Arriving At Ladbroke Grove
[CHRONOLOGY] 1972: The Other Side Of The Sky
[
ALBUM] Doremi Fasol Latido
[
INTERVIEW] DikMik

[CHRONOLOGY] 1973: We Were Born To Blow The Human Mind
[
ALBUMSpace Ritual

[INTERVIEW] Michael Moorcock
[ESSAY] Radical Escapism In The Age Of Paranoia: How Hawkwind Channelled The Apocalyptic Mindset Of 1970s Britain
[CHRONOLOGY] 1974: World Turned Upside Down Now
[
ALBUM] Hall Of The Mountain Grill
[INTERVIEW] Stacia Blake
[CHRONOLOGY] 1975: We're Tired Of Making Love
[
ALBUM] Warrior On The Edge Of Time
[INTERVIEW] Doug Smith
[ESSAY] Existing In A Genre Of One: Hawkwind In Context Of The Pre-Punk British Rock Scene
[CHRONOLOGY] 1976: Maybe It Was Only An Hallucination
[
ALBUM] Astounding Sounds, Amazing Music
[
INTERVIEW] Paul Rudolph
[INTERVIEW] Alan Powell
[CHRONOLOGY] 1977: Your Android Replica Is Playing Up Again
[
ALBUM] Quark, Strangeness And Charm
[INTERVIEW] Adrian Shaw 
[ESSAY] Cosmic Dada Nihilismus! The Hawkwind Mythos And The Space Age Re-Enchanted
[CHRONOLOGY] 1978: Give Yourself To Gravity
[
ALBUM] Hawklords/25 Years On

[INTERVIEW] Pamela Townley

[ESSAY] New Worlds And Dangerous Visions: Hawkwind As The Ultimate Science Fiction Band

[CHRONOLOGY] 1979: I Hope You've Brought Your Credit Card With You

[ALBUM] PXR5

[ESSAY] Countdown To Year Zero: Never Mind The Bollocks, Here's Hawkwind

[CHRONOLOGY] 1980: No Cause For A Deviation

[ALBUM] Live Seventy Nine

[ALBUM] Levitation

[INTERVIEW] Harvey Bainbridge

[AFTERWORD] Looking In The Future

[APPENDIX 1] Hawkwind And Related UK Discography 1970—1980

[APPENDIX 2] BBC Sessions In The 1970s

[APPENDIX 3] A Miscellany Of 70s Songs Released Post-1980

[APPENDIX 4] A 70s Filmography

[APPENDIX 5] Further Listening

Days Of The Underground is an in-depth primer to the music of Hawkwind in the 1970s. It also explores the ideas and concepts that fuelled the band during this period, and speaks to the crew that manned the ship.